The Best Stuff Seen and Heard at EMS 2016: Day Three

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Best of EMS 2016: Day Three

Brand Activations, Sports Marketing and Mobile Tours

The final morning at EMS 2016 kicked off with a “tequila sunrise” for those who got swept up in the Motive Mile High Mayhem bar crawl in the RiNo district the night before. But with a satisfying breakfast of muffins, bagels, cereals, fruits and copious amounts of coffee, our intrepid attendees sprung to life and jumped into the final day’s content and activities.

And who better to follow breakfast than Peter McGuinness, cmo at Chobani, featured keynoter of the day, who in his no-holds-barred style, described how the yogurt company is keeping the brand special in the congested $4.5 billion yogurt category through live events 52 weeks out of the year. “The richest and most relevant marketing is shared between consumers and brands,” McGuinness said. “It’s like any healthy human relationship… If there’s no reciprocity it doesn’t work.”

After a quick coffee break, we jumped back into it for another full day of more than 20 sessions led by brand-side instructors on offer, including Microsoft Partner Experience Manager Ahinsa Mansukhani, who offered 10 video content creation tips for b-to-b marketers, and Lauren Parker, Nestlé’s experiential marketing manager, who tackled Gen Z events. After a lunch of an assortment of sandwiches, salads and fruits, and a sweet popsicle stand from WE tv (thank you!), even more brand-side instruction continued—because EMS ends strong, people. Jamie Sanyal, senior manager-global experiential marketing at PayPal, offered a deep dive into the brand’s employee events. Rich Karlis, director-corporate sponsorships at CenturyLink, offered tips on thinking outside the stadium walls. And Jeffrey Regis, director of sports marketing, at Red Bull, took us through the brand’s “extreme” activations, among sessions.

With the final sessions wrapping up at 4:30, yet another EMS came to a close. We hope to see you when the Experiential Marketing Summit heads to Chicago May 3-5 in 2017. Don’t forget to check out this year’s Ex Awards winners. And be sure to share our recaps from Day One and Day Two.

Without further ado, highlights from Day Three below. Until next year… peace out!

 

THEY SAID IT: EMS 2016 DAY THREE

“We take training very seriously. Most guys who’ve done experiential marketing typically get a three ring binder, a day course and a pat on the back. We give our specialists deep dive training for the Grill Academy Tour… They’ve gone to our plants, they’ve seen assembly, they’ve sat with customer service. We want them to be an extension of our brand.”

—Mark Fenne, director-channel marketing, Weber

“Get outside and play. Get out of your office. Turn your phone off and enjoy what God has given us.”

—Jeffrey Regis, director of sports marketing, at Red Bull

“We want to connect our brand with consumers. A short-term engagement will fall short of the mark. Think of your event as a stepping stone to the next connection point in the consumer journey.”

—Kai Witbeck, event marketing manager, LEGO

“Create art that requires no signature, that is so distinctive that no one else could have done it. People will be impacted by it and can’t help but talk about it. This requires the ability to approach our work less like marketers and more like artists. Like Slash getting up to play ‘Sweet Child of Mine’; or Toni Morrison’s writing. Her voice is unmistakable.

—Srini Rao, author “The Art of Being Unmistakable” 

“In our quest to always use the latest and greatest technology we can often overlook the simple beauty and effectiveness of a low-tech moment. Sometimes these are the most shareable moments, like statues or monuments, anything that gives you a sense of place because often digital experiences can’t give you that sense of place.”

—Craig Lovin, creative director, World of Coca-Cola

“When we set out to launch the [Tru] brand we wanted to get buy-in from the owners from the outset. They know the market potentially better than we do so you want to get their insight… If they’re not passionate about the brand and supportive of the brand, it’s not going to go anywhere.”

—Tripp McLaughlin, director of brand management, Tru by Hilton

“Most event sponsorships are based on the premise of ‘we have a great deal for you because we can match you with your target.’…There’s not much value anymore in this kind of sponsorship. The [Dirty Girl] Mud Run for us didn’t just create content for us but gave us the best selling platform in the world.”

—Brian Jochum, senior marketing director, KCD Brands

“Why [the pop-up program] actually worked for us is the actual face time with the clients. There are so many ways to hide digitally, but there’s nothing better than face time… You can see our storytelling and it reinforces all of our brand strengths and opportunities.”

—Andrew Schulman, vp-client solutions and integrated marketing, WE tv

“This [Guinness World Record] event, all of it together, opened up way more many doors and blew us out of the water with what we thought was going to happen. It got us in front of different places that wouldn’t typically talk about Delta Faucet… We still have a lot of talk about the value of it a year later.”

—Missi Tate, senior brand and advertising manager, Delta Faucet

“Instead of just physical we wanted the online part of [the mobile tour] too… In Q4 we had to take our truck off the road for maintenance but we didn’t want to hit a lull. So we teamed up with Team Liquid to offer giveaways where contestants had to complete social actions… Our followers on Twitter and Instagram skyrocketed with just this one promotion.”

—Marcie Holt, brand experience manager, Alienware

See also:

Best of EMS 2016: Day One
Best of EMS 2016: Day Two

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