Women in Events Share Their Favorite Books and TED Talks

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Women in Events Share Their Favorite Books and TED Talks

Every year, our Women in Events special report offers insights from some of the best and brightest females in the industry. In our roundtable discussions with this year’s crop of leading ladies, we heard about mutual concerns like balancing home and work life and breaking the glass ceiling—but we also got a little more personal. Every great trailblazer finds inspiration in other leaders, so to find out what makes this year’s Women in Events tick, we asked them to share the books and TED Talks that have influenced them the most. Here, we take a look at a few of their recommendations.

 

WIE_nice girls book“NICE GIRLS DON’T GET THE CORNER OFFICE” (Lois P. Frankel)

“I went into it thinking, ‘I don’t know if this is really going to teach me anything.’ And then, there’s something about the way the book is written. It gives case studies of the top challenges and issues that women face, and what the typical female does in order to handle them in the workplace environment. And sometimes, it’s not until you read something like that, that you realize, ‘Oh, yeah, I actually do that, too. I’m guilty of that.’”
-Dayna Adelman, corporate social responsibility manager, Heineken USA

 


WIE_the alchemist“THE ALCHEMIST” (Paulo Coelho)

“A book that I always keep close and is always on my shelf and I look at from time to time. It is a fantastic book, good for soul searching, and within that story are two quotes that I keep with me, and I think relate back to both personal and professional [life]: ‘There is only one thing that makes a dream impossible to achieve—the fear of failure’ and ‘The secret of life is to fall seven times and to get up eight times.’ I keep them close and remind myself of them in terms of reaching higher and continuing to pursue your dreams.”
-Ashley Albrittain-Ross, marketing manager, Perrier

 


WIE_pillars of earth“PILLARS OF THE EARTH” (Ken Follett)

“I read it a long time ago but think about it often. It’s set in the 12th century and is about a priest and a builder who come together to bring this little town to greatness through their vision of building an amazing cathedral… I always thought it was kind of like business, and you have this crazy idea of something you want to do, no one has ever done it, people are nay-saying and you have to get the team inspired to help you. You need their manpower and support, and you have to transfer knowledge… I feel there are a lot of lessons in it for everyday life and business, and inspiring people to stick to their goals.”
-Alyson Griffin, vp-global marketing and communications, Intel

 


“HOW TO MANAGE FOR COLLECTIVE CREATIVITY” (Linda Hill)

“It is all about creating innovation within your team and how it is a journey, and about problem solving and trial and error situations or processes that they use. She has authored a book called “Collective Genius,” so she talks about how innovation does not occur by individual genius but only occurs through collective genius. She is a psychologist, so she looks at it through that lens.” -Sandy Joyce, head of global event marketing, Discover Financial Services

 


WIE_the 4 agreements“THE FOUR AGREEMENTS” (Don Miguel Ruiz)

“It is really a practical guide to personal freedom and I use it both in my professional and personal life, and I use it with my team as well. It is a very basic read but it is a very impactful and meaningful read. The four agreements are to be impeccable with your word, don’t take anything personally, don’t make assumptions and always do your best. That is something that I live by, and that book has a lot of meaning to me.”
-Sylvia Lopez-Navarro, national manager-partnerships and experiential marketing, Kia

 

 


“BEFORE I DIE” (Candy Chang)

“I don’t mean to get a little heavy here, but she is an artist and she did this public art project [and TED Talk] where she took abandoned spaces and had the community fill in the blank, basically, fill in the sentence, ‘Before I die.’ It was just a really inspiring and powerful message that challenges you to rethink your life and community and neighbors in a totally different way.” -Donna Siclari, vp-event management, strategic marketing group, Scholastic

 


WIE_Freakonomics“FREAKONOMICS” (Stephen J. Dubner and Steven Levitt)

“Being a traditionally liberal arts thinker, I always shied away from analytics and data and what I would consider more math skills, and that book really did open my eyes to the importance of not being afraid of numbers and thinking about numbers in a way that can be pulled apart and reassembled differently based on what you are trying to convey.” -Staci Parr, director-corporate events, Equinix

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