Made in New York: Brands Take on the World Maker Faire

World Maker Faire 2015 at New York Hall of Science in Queens, New York

Brands Take on the World Maker Faire in New York

The Maker Movement is captivating consumers worldwide and, according to some experts, could soon become a catalyst for a new era in our economy. But beyond the economic implications, the movement is also an influential platform for brand engagement. Its culture is difficult to categorize, and that is exactly what makes it so appealing to forward-thinking sponsors of Maker Faire, Maker Media’s event platform for the tech-influenced DIY community and the longest-running maker-targeted event in the space.

Following are three brands leveraging the Maker Movement to make connections with the tech enthusiasts, crafters, educators, tinkerers, hobbyists, engineers, science clubs, authors and artists who assemble for the annual World Maker Faire in New York City.

 

maker faire intelIntel

Intel offered hands-on learning activities and interactive demonstrations of inventions created with its Edison and Galileo development platforms. The brand also hosted a performance by Thud Rumble, world-famous musical artists, turntablists and hackers of scratch dj equipment, and the crew from Two Bit Circus, carnival-style games related to STEAM studies (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math).

 


maker faire googleGoogle

Google employees shared company and personal projects including a CNC microscope and the HugBot, a squishable robot that hugs your hand. Attendees also demoed Cardboard, Google’s open source VR viewer. Google returned as the Learn to Solder area sponsor and provided 65,000 safety glasses for use in that area as makers of all ages learned soldering skills by creating their very own blinking LED pin.

 


maker faire disneyDisney

From the original imagination experts, Disney VoluntEARS hosted activities based on the successful Miles From Tomorrowland: Space Missions program, which engaged kids and families throughout the summer of 2015. The program engaged kids in STEAM learning activities by inspiring them to make their own “out-of-this-world” creations, including a mix of rockets, robots, planets and technology.

 

See also:

Why Brands are Falling in Love with the Maker Movement

This story appeared in the May 2016 issue

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