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EDF Energy Charges Up Olympic Park

To shine a light on its efforts and interest in green and renewable sources of energy, UK energy bigwig EDF is activating an Electric Company pavilion inside the grounds of Olympic Park. Is has been dubbed… The Power of Electricity.

The exhibit is swathed in white cloth and warm colors that present the brand with similar attributes from the outset. Outside, brand ambassadors with tablet computers invite consumers to take an augmented reality-style photo with Olympians Victoria Pendleton and Yahnick Agnel. The photos are then available for download from the brand’s Facebook page. At the same time, attendees with a smartphone can download an AR app that interacts with several of the different areas inside the pavilion. Moving inside, attendees are ushered into a pitch black theater and treated to both air conditioning and a short movie about how electricity “powers the lives” of everyone in the world, and in some surprising ways. The movie screen is about 30-feet wide and sharply curved to create an IMAX-like effect, which increases impact.

 

The next stop is a main activation area, and it’s back to light and airy. The breeze pushes through the open design, and as guests start to play interactive games, they enjoy a cool oasis away from the bustle of the Park. The biggest and clearest demonstration of the brand’s eco-mentality is found in the middle of the room: a 20-foot high inverted cone of lights are powered up by attendees running on sensitive floor pads, or cranking madly at a box with a hand crank. Trails of “electric energy” trace across the floor as the power levels build up and a soft, robotic British woman’s voice comes from above to tell the participants how close they are to “full power.”

 

The walls are plastered with facts about EDF, electricity and power generation, and in the rear is a dual-touch touchscreen game activation. One surface has a consumer madly swipe to simulate swimming, and the energy it develops, while the other compares that amount of energy to other, more understandable things. For instance, one average swim in a pool uses as much energy as 48 loads of laundry, or 8885 straight days of television.

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